Legislative and Congressional Redistricting

Redistricting is the process of drawing the districts from which public officials are elected. Once elected, the districts define who those officials represent during their terms in office. Members of the United States House of Representatives, the North Carolina Senate and the North Carolina House of Representatives are elected by district. The North Carolina General Assembly is required to redraw these districts following each decennial census due to population changes and the need to maintain equal representation. Due to legal challenges, there is often mid-decade redistricting activity as well.

For balanced representation, district populations are required to be at least approximately equal to one another. A complete count of the U.S. population was last conducted in 2010, in the decennial census. Following release of the 2010 census data, one of the first redistricting tasks was to calculate the new ideal district population for each legislative body. For statewide redistricting using single member districts, the ideal district population is simply the state's population divided by the number of districts. Once the new ideal population was known, population deviation maps and reports were created to help assess how far out of balance existing district plans had become over the course of the previous decade.

North Carolina House district plan to be used for the 2020 election cycle. The district plan was given the name '2019 House Remedial Map'. Enacted by the NC General Assembly on September 17, 2019 as House Bill 1020, becoming Session Law 2019-220. District boundaries are based on 2010 census tabulation blocks.

North Carolina House district plan used for the 2018 election cycle. Ordered by the U.S. Supreme Court on February 6, 2018 in North Carolina v. Covington. Districts in all but Mecklenburg and Wake counties are those drawn by a special master. The districts of Mecklenburg and Wake counties are those of the 2017 'House Redistricting Plan A2' (Session Law 2017-208). District boundaries are based on 2010 census tabulation blocks.

North Carolina House district plan enacted by the NC General Assembly, but not ultimately used in an election. The district plan was given the name '2017 House Redistricting Plan A2'. Enacted on August 31, 2017 as House Bill 927, becoming Session Law 2017-208. District boundaries are based on 2010 census tabulation blocks.

North Carolina House district plan used for the 2012, 2014, and 2016 election cycles. The district plan was given the name 'Lewis-Dollar-Dockham 4'. Enacted by the NC General Assembly on July 28, 2011 as House Bill 937, becoming Session Law 2011-404. District boundaries are based on 2010 census tabulation blocks.

North Carolina House district plan used for the 2010 election cycle. Enacted by the NC General Assembly on June 11, 2009 as House Bill 1621, becoming Session Law 2009-78. District boundaries are based on 2000 census tabulation blocks.

North Carolina House district plan used for the 2004, 2006, and 2008 election cycles. Enacted by the NC General Assembly on November 25, 2003 as House Bill 3, becoming Session Law 2003-434. District boundaries are based on 2000 census tabulation blocks.

North Carolina House district plan used for the 2002 election cycle. Ordered by the North Carolina Superior Court. The plan was released on May 31, 2002. District boundaries are based on 2000 census tabulation blocks.

North Carolina House district plan enacted by the NC General Assembly, but not ultimately used in an election. The district plan was given the name 'Proposed House Plan – Sutton 5'. Enacted on May 17, 2002 as House Bill 4, becoming Session Law 2002-1. District boundaries are based on 2000 census tabulation blocks.

North Carolina House district plan enacted by the NC General Assembly, but not ultimately used in an election. The district plan was given the name 'Sutton House Plan 3'. Enacted on November 13, 2001 as House Bill 1025, becoming Session Law 2001-459. District boundaries are based on 2000 census tabulation blocks.

North Carolina House district plan used for the 1992, 1994, 1996, 1998, and 2000 election cycles. The district plan was given the name '1992 House Base Plan 5'. Enacted by the NC General Assembly on January 14, 1992 as House Bill 2, becoming Session Law 1991-5es. District boundaries are based primarily on 1990 census tabulation blocks.

North Carolina Senate district plan to be used for the 2020 election cycle. The district plan was given the name '2019 Senate Consensus Nonpartisan Map'. Enacted by the NC General Assembly on September 17, 2019 as Senate Bill 692, becoming Session Law 2019-219. District boundaries are based on 2010 census tabulation blocks.

North Carolina Senate district plan used for the 2018 election cycle. Ordered by the U.S. Supreme Court on February 6, 2018 in North Carolina v. Covington. District boundaries are based on 2010 census tabulation blocks.

North Carolina Senate district plan enacted by the NC General Assembly, but not ultimately used in an election. The district plan was referred to as '2017 Senate Floor Redistricting Plan - 4th Ed'. Enacted on August 31, 2017 as Senate Bill 691, becoming Session Law 2017-207. District boundaries are based on 2010 census tabulation blocks.

North Carolina Senate district plan used for the 2012, 2014, and 2016 election cycles. The district plan was given the name 'Rucho Senate 2'. Enacted by the NC General Assembly on July 27, 2011 as Senate Bill 455, becoming Session Law 2011-402. District boundaries are based on 2010 census tabulation blocks.

North Carolina Senate district plan used for the 2004, 2006, 2008, and 2010 election cycles. The district plan was named simply '2003 Senate Redistricting Plan'. Enacted by the NC General Assembly on 11/25/2003 as part of House Bill 3, becoming Session Law 2003-434. District boundaries are based on 2000 census tabulation blocks.

North Carolina Senate district plan used for the 2002 election cycle. Ordered by the North Carolina Superior Court. The plan was released on May 31, 2002. District boundaries are based on 2000 census tabulation blocks.

North Carolina Senate district plan enacted by the NC General Assembly, but not ultimately used in an election. The district plan was given the name 'Senate Fewer Divided Counties'. Enacted on May 17, 2002 as House Bill 4, becoming Session Law 2002-1. District boundaries are based on 2000 census tabulation blocks.

North Carolina Senate district plan enacted by the NC General Assembly, but not ultimately used in an election. The district plan was given the name 'NC Senate Plan 1C'. Enacted on November 13, 2001 as Senate Bill 798, becoming Session Law 2001-458. District boundaries are based on 2000 census tabulation blocks.

North Carolina Senate district plan used for the 1992, 1994, 1996, 1998, and 2000 election cycles. The district plan was given the name '1992 Senate Base Plan 6'. Enacted by the NC General Assembly on January 14, 1992 as Senate Bill 2, becoming Session Law 1991-4es. District boundaries are based primarily on 1990 census tabulation blocks.

North Carolina congressional district plan to be used for the 2020 election cycle. Enacted by the NC General Assembly on November 15, 2019 as House Bill 1029, becoming Session Law 2019-249. District boundaries are based on 2010 census tabulation blocks.

North Carolina congressional district plan used for the 2016 and 2018 election cycles. The district plan was given the name '2016 Contingent Congressional Plan - Corrected'. Enacted by the NC General Assembly on February 19, 2016 as Senate Bill 2, becoming Session Law 2016-1. District boundaries are based on 2010 census tabulation blocks.

North Carolina congressional district plan used for the 2012 and 2014 election cycles. The district plan was given the name 'Rucho-Lewis Congress 3'. Enacted by the NC General Assembly on July 28, 2011 as Senate Bill 453, becoming Session Law 2011-403. Following enactment, the geographic unit listing in the bill text was found to be incomplete due to a software error. The text was corrected via Session Law 2011-414. District boundaries are based on 2010 census tabulation blocks.

North Carolina congressional district plan used for the 2002, 2004, 2006, 2008, and 2010 election cycles. The district plan was given the name 'Congress ZeroDeviation'. Enacted by the NC General Assembly on December 5, 2001 as House Bill 32, becoming Session Law 2001-479. District boundaries are based on 2000 census tabulation blocks.

North Carolina congressional district plan used for the 1998 election cycle. The district plan was given the name '98 Congressional Plan A'. Enacted by the NC General Assembly on May 21, 1998 as House Bill 1394, becoming Session Law 1998-2. District boundaries are based primarily on 1990 census tabulation blocks.

North Carolina congressional district plan used for the 2000 election cycle. The district plan was given the name '97 House-Senate Plan A'. Enacted by the NC General Assembly on March 31, 1997 as House Bill 586, becoming Session Law 1997-11. The plan was originally slated to be used for the 1998 elections but was held unconstitutional by federal court ruling. The district plan '1998 CONGRESSIONAL PLAN A' was used instead. A Supreme Court decision subsequently reversed that lower court ruling. This plan was therefore used for the 2000 elections. District boundaries are based primarily on 1990 census tabulation blocks.

North Carolina congressional district plan used for the 1992, 1994, and 1996 election cycles. The district plan was given the name '1992 Congressional Base Plan 10'. Enacted by the NC General Assembly on January 24, 1992 as House Bill 3, becoming Session Law 1991-7es. District boundaries are based primarily on 1990 census tabulation blocks.